ICO Fines “World’s Largest Facial Network” – Europe’s leading provider of IG Training


The Information Commissioner’s Office has issued a Monetary Penalty Notice of £7,552,800 to Clearview AI Inc for breaches of the UK GDPR. 

Clearview is a US based company which describes itself as the “World’s Largest Facial Network”. It allows customers, including the police, to upload an image of a person to its app, which is then checked against all the images in the Clearview database. The app then provides a list of matching images with a link to the websites from where they came from. 

Clearview’s online database contains 20 billion images of people’s faces and data scraped from publicly available information on the internet and social media platforms all over the world. This service was used on a free trial basis by a number of UK law enforcement agencies. The trial was discontinued and the service is no longer being offered in the UK. However Clearview has customers in other countries, so the ICO ruled that is still processing the personal data of UK residents.

The ICO was of the view that, given the high number of UK internet and social media users, Clearview’s database is likely to include a substantial amount of data from UK residents, which has been gathered without their knowledge. It found the company had breached the UK GDPR by:

  • failing to use the information of people in the UK in a way that is fair and transparent, given that individuals are not made aware or would not reasonably expect their personal data to be used in this way;
  • failing to have a lawful reason for collecting people’s information;
  • failing to have a process in place to stop the data being retained indefinitely;
  • failing to meet the higher data protection standards required for biometric data (Special Category Data):
  • asking for additional personal information, including photos, when asked by members of the public if they are on their database. This may have acted as a disincentive to individuals who wish to object to their data being collected and used.

The ICO has also issued an enforcement notice ordering Clearview to stop obtaining and using the personal data of UK residents that is publicly available on the internet, and to delete the data of UK residents from its systems.

The precise legal basis for the ICO’s fine will only be known when (hopefully not if) it decides to publish the Monetary Penalty Notice. The information we have so far suggests that it considered breaches of Article 5 (1st and 5th Principles – lawfulness, transparency and data retention) Article 9 (Special Category Data) and Article 14 (privacy notice) amongst others.  

Whilst substantially lower than the £17 million Notice of Intent, issued in November 2021, this fine shows that the new Information Commissioner, John Edwards, is willing to take on at least some of the big tech companies. 

The ICO enforcement action comes after a joint investigation with the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC). The latter also ordered the company to stop processing citizens’ data and delete any information it held. France, Itlay and Canada have also sanctioned the company under the EU GDPR. 

So what next for Clearview? The ICO has very limited means to enforce a fine against foreign entities.  Clearview has no operations or offices in the UK so it could just refuse to pay. This may be problematic from a public relations perspective as many of Clearview’s customers are law enforcement agencies in Europe who may not be willing to associate themselves with a company that has been found to have breached EU privacy laws. 

When the Italian DP regulator fined Clearview €20m (£16.9m) earlier this year, it responded by saying it did not operate in any way that brought it under the jurisdiction of the EU GDPR. Could it argue the same in the UK, where it also has no operations, customers or headquarters? Students of our  UK GDPR Practitioner certificate course will know that the answer lies in Article 3(2) which is sets out the extra territorial effect of the UK GDPR:

This Regulation applies to the relevant processing of personal data of data subjects who are in the United Kingdom by a controller or processor not established in the United Kingdom where the processing activities are related to:

  1. the offering of goods or services, irrespective of whether a payment of the data subject is required, to such data subjects in the United Kingdom; or
  2. the monitoring of their behaviour as far as their behaviour takes place within the United Kingdom. [our emphasis]

Whilst clearly Clearview (no pun intended) is not established in the UK, the ICO is of the view it is covered by the UK GDPR due to Article 3(2). See the statement of the Commissioner, John Edwards:

“Clearview AI Inc has collected multiple images of people all over the world, including in the UK, from a variety of websites and social media platforms, creating a database with more than 20 billion images. The company not only enables identification of those people, but effectively monitors their behaviour and offers it as a commercial service. That is unacceptable. That is why we have acted to protect people in the UK by both fining the company and issuing an enforcement notice.”

If Clearview does appeal, we will hopefully receive judicial guidance about the territorial scope of the  UK GDPR.   

This and other GDPR developments will be discussed in detail on our forthcoming GDPR Update workshop. We also have a few places left on our Advanced Certificate in GDPR Practice course starting in July.



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