The New EU Data Governance Act – Your Front Page For Information Governance News


On 17th May 2022, The Council of the European Union adopted the Data Governance Act (DGA) or Regulation on European data governance and amending Regulation (EU) 2018/1724 (Data Governance Act) (2020/0340 (COD) to give its full title. The Act aims to boost data sharing in the EU allowing companies to have access to more data to develop new products and services. 

The DGA will achieve its aims through measures designed to increase trust in relation to data sharing, creating new rules on the neutrality of data marketplaces and facilitating the reuse of public sector data. The European Commission says in its Questions and Answers document

The economic and societal potential of data use is enormous: it can enable new products and services based on novel technologies, make production more efficient, and provide tools for combatting societal challenges“.

Application

The DGA will increase the amount of data available for re-use within the EU by allowing public sector data to be used for purposes different than the ones for which it was originally collected. The Act will also create sector-specific data spaces to enable the sharing of data within a specific sector e.g. transport, health, energy or agriculture.

Data is defined as “any digital representation of acts, facts or information and any compilation of such acts, facts or information, including in the form of sound, visual or audiovisual recording” that is held by public sector bodies and which is not subject to the Open Data Directive but is subject to the rights of others. Examples include data generated by GPS and healthcare data, which if put to productive use, could contribute to improving the quality of services. The Commission estimates that the Act could increase the economic value of data by up to €11 billion by 2028.

Each EU Member State will be required to establish a supervisory authority to act as a single information point providing assistance to governments. They will also be required to establish a register of available public sector data. The European Data Innovation Board (see later) will have oversight responsibilities and maintain a central register of available DGA Data. 

On first reading the DGA seems similar to The Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 which implemented Directive 2013/37/EU. The aim of the latter was to remove obstacles that stood in the way of re-using public sector information. However the DGA goes much further. 

Data Intermediary Services 

The European Commission believes that, in order to encourage individuals to allow their data to be shared, they should trust the process by which such data is handled. To this end, the DGA creates data sharing service providers known as “data intermediaries”, which will handle the sharing of data by individuals, public bodies and private companies. The idea is to provide an alternative to the existing major tech platforms.

To uphold trust in data intermediaries, the DGA puts in place several protective measures. Firstly, intermediaries will have to notify public authorities of their intention to provide data-sharing services. Secondly, they will have to commit to the protection of sensitive and confidential data. Finally, the DGA imposes strict requirements to ensure the intermediaries’ neutrality. These providers will have to distinguish their data sharing services from other commercial operations and are prohibited from using the shared data for any other purposes. 

Data Altruism

The DGA encourages data altruism. This where data subjects (or holders of non-personal data) consent to their data being used for the benefit of society e.g. scientific research purposes or improving public services. Organisations who participate in these activities will be entered into a register held by the relevant Member State’s supervisory authority. In order to share data for these purposes, a data altruism consent form will be used to obtain data subjects’ consent.

The DGA will also create a European Data Innovation Board. Its missions would be to oversee the data sharing service providers (the data intermediaries) and provide advice on best practices for data sharing.

The UK

Brexit means that the DGA will not apply in the UK, although it clearly may affect UK businesses doing business in the EU. It remains to be seen whether the UK will take similar approach although it notable that UK proposals for amending GDPR include “amending the law to facilitate innovative re-use of data for different purposes and by different data controllers.”

The DGA will shortly be published in the Official Journal of the European Union and enter into force 20 days after publication. The new rules will apply 15 months thereafter. To further encourage data sharing, on 23 February 2022 the European Commission proposed a Data Act that is currently being worked on.

This and other GDPR developments will be discussed in detail on our forthcoming GDPR Update workshop. We also have a few places left on our Advanced Certificate in GDPR Practice course starting in July.



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